MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD IN THE MIDDLE EAST

MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD IN THE MIDDLE EAST

BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS, DEMOCRATIC TRANSITIONS AND NEW REALITIES

Thursday 7 June 2018

6pm-9pm

Central London

Speakers:

Dr Gillian Kennedy — Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, Department of Middle Eastern Studies, King’s College London; author, From Independence to Revolution – Egypt’s Islamists and the Contest for Power.

Courtney Freer — Research Officer at the Kuwait Programme, London School of Economics and Political Science

Dr Azzam Tamimi — Author and commentator, his books include Power-Sharing Islam (1993), Islam & Secularism in the Middle East (2000), Rachid Ghannouchi: a Democrat within Islamism (2001) and Hamas: Unwritten Chapters (2006).

Dr Barbara Zollner — Lecturer in Middle East Politics at Birkbeck, University of London. Author, The Muslim Brotherhood: Hasan al-Hudaybi and Ideology (2007).

Dr Maha Azzam — Formerly with Chatham House, she leads the Egyptian Revolutionary Council and was an advisor on the British Academy for Humanities and Social Sciences’ MENA panel.

Dr Anas Altikriti — CEO, The Cordoba Foundation

Monica Marks — Visiting Fellow, European Council on Foreign Relations.

All welcome

Register here

EGYPT – COURTING CHAOS AND CONTROVERSY

EGYPT – COURTING CHAOS AND CONTROVERSY

THE CIRCUMVENTION OF THE RULE OF LAW, HUMAN RIGHTS AND FUNDAMENTAL FREEDOMS BY THE EGYPTIAN JUDICIARY

Wed 18 July 2018
6:30pm-8:30pm
Cavendish Square, London W1G
Panel:

Ibrahim Halawa — In August 2013, 21-year-old Irishman Halawa spent more than four years in prison in Egypt and faced a mass trial with hundreds of others threatened with the death penalty. He was detained with three of his sisters, who were also tried (in absentia) and acquitted.

Drewery Dyke — is a Research Fellow at The Foreign Policy Centre. He was a Researcher for Amnesty International between 1999 and 2017, and has led work on Afghanistan, and the Middle East. He has contributed to other projects, including with Minority Rights Group and Transparency International.

Bill Law — is an award-winning journalist who joined the BBC in 1995 and since 2002 has reported extensively from the Middle East. In 2003 he was one of the first journalists to cover the beginnings of the insurgency that engulfed Iraq, and his documentary, The Gulf: Armed & Dangerous, aired in late 2010 anticipated the revolutions that became the Arab Spring.

Toby Cadman — is a Barrister and the Co-founder and Head of Guernica 37 International Justice Chambers in London. He specialises in international law, and the pursuit of justice through international accountability mechanisms such as the ICC, the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights, the ICTY, and the Bosnian War Crimes Chamber.

Carl Buckley — Chambers Director at Guernica 37, is a Barrister with an established international practice, specialising in the UN system of protection, and the investigation of international human rights violations.

 

Moderator

Dr Anas Altikriti — is CEO and Founder of The Cordoba Foundation.

 

All welcome

Free Admission (copies of the Executive Summary of the report will be available to registered guests)

Register: https://egyptreport.eventbrite.co.uk

International Symposium: Cosmopolitanism, Religion and the Public Sphere

Do cosmopolitanism and religion stand in opposition with each other? To which extent are cosmopolitan ideas, practices and narratives meaningful to the religious experiences and affiliations of concrete individuals and groups? To which extent have religious communities made use of cosmopolitanism as a cultural resource that is channelled by institutional structures? Which media platforms are available to religious organizations and movements concerned with the promotion of cosmopolitan solidarity and ecumenical understanding at both local and transnational level?

 

Cosmopolitanism gains momentum both as a practice that is apparent in things that people do and say to positively engage with the ‘otherness of the other’, and as a moral ideal that emphasises both tolerance towards difference and the possibility of a more just world order. Religion is not often seen in connection to cosmopolitanism, a notion that is commonly equated to worldliness and secularism. In fact, some religious affiliations and practices are understood as bound to parochialism, tradition, and lack of tolerance. In the media, the debate on religion is often tied to public discourses about terrorism, security and freedom of expression and opinion in the public sphere. This is particularly significant when we consider the way in which Islam is publicly perceived in the western world as a highly institutionalized religion with a strong influence on the conduct of and collective identity of Muslim communities. The growing visibility of Muslim identity in the public sphere, through particular forms of attire, behaviour, and symbols, is seen as potentially fuelling xenophobia and ethnic conflict in collective imaginaries across the Western world. The continuing controversy over the public use of the headscarf in France, the 2005 affair over the publication of the Danish cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, and the 2009 Swiss vote to ban new mosque minarets, are only a few recent examples of how particular religious symbols and practices make the assertion of Muslim identity more visible in the public sphere. The fact that fundamentalist Islam is being increasingly tied to global terrorism in the mass media has played a key role on stirring the perception of fundamentalist Islam as a threat to individual freedoms and peace. While there is a growing interest in the meanings of religion and secularism in both media and scholarly debates, the linkages between cosmopolitanism and religion only very recently received the attention of sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists and religious scholars concerned with the role of religion in public life.  This is in part because particularistic attachments to a community of faith sit uneasily with the ethical universalism and secular ideals of justice and equality that underpin cosmopolitan discourses and perspectives. Yet, while religions divide social groups and ethnic communities, religions can also offer influential forms of transnational, cosmopolitan solidarity and play a key role in conflict resolution both locally and globally. In pursuing particular forms of ecumenical understanding, religious organizations have, through history, always dealt with problems and challenges concerning the question of the ‘inclusion of the other’, which is at the heart of characterizations of cosmopolitanism as an ethico-political outlook.

 

By bringing together leading scholars from religious studies, sociology and anthropology, this conference seeks to investigate the connection between religion and cosmopolitanism and the role of religion in the public sphere through the lens of sociological, anthropological and theological perspectives.

 

The Cordoba Foundation will be presenting a paper here on its experiences and thoughts for Cosmopolitanism

 

For further information, please click here

International Symposium: Cosmopolitanism, Religion and the Public Sphere

Do cosmopolitanism and religion stand in opposition with each other? To which extent are cosmopolitan ideas, practices and narratives meaningful to the religious experiences and affiliations of concrete individuals and groups? To which extent have religious communities made use of cosmopolitanism as a cultural resource that is channelled by institutional structures? Which media platforms are available to religious organizations and movements concerned with the promotion of cosmopolitan solidarity and ecumenical understanding at both local and transnational level?

Cosmopolitanism gains momentum both as a practice that is apparent in things that people do and say to positively engage with the ‘otherness of the other’, and as a moral ideal that emphasises both tolerance towards difference and the possibility of a more just world order. Religion is not often seen in connection to cosmopolitanism, a notion that is commonly equated to worldliness and secularism. In fact, some religious affiliations and practices are understood as bound to parochialism, tradition, and lack of tolerance. In the media, the debate on religion is often tied to public discourses about terrorism, security and freedom of expression and opinion in the public sphere. This is particularly significant when we consider the way in which Islam is publicly perceived in the western world as a highly institutionalized religion with a strong influence on the conduct of and collective identity of Muslim communities. The growing visibility of Muslim identity in the public sphere, through particular forms of attire, behaviour, and symbols, is seen as potentially fuelling xenophobia and ethnic conflict in collective imaginaries across the Western world. The continuing controversy over the public use of the headscarf in France, the 2005 affair over the publication of the Danish cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, and the 2009 Swiss vote to ban new mosque minarets, are only a few recent examples of how particular religious symbols and practices make the assertion of Muslim identity more visible in the public sphere. The fact that fundamentalist Islam is being increasingly tied to global terrorism in the mass media has played a key role on stirring the perception of fundamentalist Islam as a threat to individual freedoms and peace. While there is a growing interest in the meanings of religion and secularism in both media and scholarly debates, the linkages between cosmopolitanism and religion only very recently received the attention of sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists and religious scholars concerned with the role of religion in public life.  This is in part because particularistic attachments to a community of faith sit uneasily with the ethical universalism and secular ideals of justice and equality that underpin cosmopolitan discourses and perspectives. Yet, while religions divide social groups and ethnic communities, religions can also offer influential forms of transnational, cosmopolitan solidarity and play a key role in conflict resolution both locally and globally. In pursuing particular forms of ecumenical understanding, religious organizations have, through history, always dealt with problems and challenges concerning the question of the ‘inclusion of the other’, which is at the heart of characterizations of cosmopolitanism as an ethico-political outlook.

By bringing together leading scholars from religious studies, sociology and anthropology, this conference seeks to investigate the connection between religion and cosmopolitanism and the role of religion in the public sphere through the lens of sociological, anthropological and theological perspectives.

The Cordoba Foundation will be presenting a paper here on its experiences and thoughts for Cosmopolitanism

For further information, please click here

 

Seminar: Afghanistan / Pakistan Futures – US Perspectives

With the drawdown of US combat troops from Afghanistan after July 2011 and the planned transition of security to Afghan command by the end of 2014, what are the key priorities for US policy in Afghanistan and Pakistan?

The White House annual policy review last December said that: ‘The core goal of the US strategy in the Afghanistan and Pakistan theatre remains to disrupt, dismantle, and eventually defeat al-Qaeda in the region and to prevent its return.’ This built upon US President Barack Obama’s West Point speech a year before in which he said: ‘Our security is at stake in Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is the epicentre of violent extremism practiced by al-Qaeda.’

To achieve its goals, what form will US military and civilian engagement in Afghanistan take in the future? To what extent will the US support attempts at reconciliation between the Afghan government and the Taliban leadership?

Prof Vali Nasr is Senior Advisor to the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the US State Department. He is Professor of International Politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. From 2003-07 he was Professor and Chair of Research, Department of National Security Affairs at the US Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey and from 2007-09, Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.

He has authored six books on political Islam, including, most recently, Meccanomics: The Rise of the New Muslim Middle Class and What it will do for our World.

This event will be chaired by Adam Ward, Director of Studies, IISS.

This is a joint event between the IISS and The Cordoba Foundation

If you would like further information please contact  Charlotte Laycock at events@iiss.org

Meeting: Contending Modernities

The Cordoba Foundation will take part in a three day consulation meeting organised by Notre Dame University (USA) on the theme of Contending Modernities, which is a major multi-year, cross-cultural,  interdisciplinary research initiative focused on generating new knowledge and greater understanding of the ways in which religious and secular forces interact for good and for ill in the modern world.  By examining these interactions, the study hopes to identify ways for religious and non-religious people and institutions to work together in addressing the world’s most pressing problems.

 

 Venue: Notre Dame Centre, London

 

 

For more information about the project, please click here

Lecture Tour Australia- Take Action: Invest in Your Community

The Australian Islamic Mission (AIM) in Sydney will be hosting several community events which involves a series of talks / workshops by  Anas Altikriti the CEO of The Cordoba Foundation

 For  more information, please click here

 

The Federation of Australian Muslim Students and Youth will also be hosting  Anas Altikriti for a series of lectures and seminars in Melbourne.

 

For more details please contact

admin@vic.famsy.org.au   

 

Debate: Must Muslim Leades be Blamed for Extremism in Britain?

Debate: Must Muslim Leades be Blamed for Extremism in Britain?

A live radio debate, to be aired on the Muslim Community Radio (MCR 87.8fm) and mcrlive.net on 3rd October 2007.

Speakers include: Moazzam Begg, – Cage Prisoners

Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra – Leicester Imam

Jamal Harwood – Hizb ut-Tahrir

Dr Daud Abdullah – MCB | Abdur-Rehman Malik – Q-News

Shaykh Haytham Al-Haddad – Al-Muntada Al-Islami

Azad Ali – Islamic Forum of Europe.

Listen to the debate here (mp3)